Why not make after hours shopping fun for mums?

Why not make after hours shopping fun for mums?

01-Sep-2013

Having a baby transformed my life in many ways. But there was one unexpected change. It altered the way I did my supermarket shopping.

At first, when she was a very little baby, I embraced online shopping for heavy items and staples.

Then I used to shop almost daily for other things, as I had the time to do so. When I returned to work, I found myself escaping at night. I would leave the child with the husband, while I set off to shop for groceries, usually on a Thursday or a Friday.

It was a strange, guilty pleasure of sorts.

I would eject the ABC4Kids CD from the car stereo and crank up Snow Patrol. There was easy parking to be found.

I would wander unrushed through the aisles, looking at new products, comparing packages and prices. I could linger in front of the magazines and flick through a few of the gossip titles, sneak a lolly or Freddo frog from a packet without having to share and generally indulge in time on my own while completing a necessary chore.

It was terrific.

Returning to social research after maternity leave, conducting sessions with groups of mums with young kids, I learned that my little ritual (which I thought was atypical) was also shared by other mothers.

“I don’t mind going to do the groceries myself because I like to look at things, choose what I want. It gives me that hour, hour-and-a-half, to myself without the kids. I go up to the supermarket at night after I’ve put them into bed. It’s quiet, there’s no one in the shop. I like to drive up there, no kids in the back, put the music on,” they would say.

It has always struck me as odd that supermarkets and other late night retail environments don’t toy with the idea of doing more in the evenings for mums looking for ‘me’ time while also getting things done. Australian consumers have recognised that overseas retailers are doing this to great effect.

In the UK, often on their late night shopping night, they’ll offer you a beer or glass of wine. You don’t mind waiting the 10 minutes because you know you can walk around with your beer and just take your time.

You get out of the shops totally in peace and you find you’ve bought something.

Consumers are constantly telling us how they want retailers to ramp up efforts to engage them in store – samples and taste tests, advice and demonstration. Perhaps even cute shelf stackers?

A lady can dream.



Having a baby transformed my life in many ways. But there was one unexpected change. It altered the way I did my supermarket shopping.
 
At first, when she was a very little baby, I embraced online shopping for heavy items and staples.
 
Then I used to shop almost daily for other things, as I had the time to do so. When I returned to work, I found myself escaping at night. I would leave the child with the husband, while I set off to shop for groceries, usually on a Thursday or a Friday.
 
It was a strange, guilty pleasure of sorts.
 
I would eject the ABC4Kids CD from the car stereo and crank up Snow Patrol. There was easy parking to be found.
 
I would wander unrushed through the aisles, looking at new products, comparing packages and prices. I could linger in front of the magazines and flick through a few of the gossip titles, sneak a lolly or Freddo frog from a packet without having to share and generally indulge in time on my own while completing a necessary chore.
 
It was terrific.
 
Returning to social research after maternity leave, conducting sessions with groups of mums with young kids, I learned that my little ritual (which I thought was atypical) was also shared by other mothers.
 
“I don’t mind going to do the groceries myself because I like to look at things, choose what I want. It gives me that hour, hour-and-a-half, to myself without the kids. I go up to the supermarket at night after I’ve put them into bed. It’s quiet, there’s no one in the shop. I like to drive up there, no kids in the back, put the music on,” they would say.
 
It has always struck me as odd that supermarkets and other late night retail environments don’t toy with the idea of doing more in the evenings for mums looking for ‘me’ time while also getting things done. Australian consumers have recognised that overseas retailers are doing this to great effect.
 
In the UK, often on their late night shopping night, they’ll offer you a beer or glass of wine. You don’t mind waiting the 10 minutes because you know you can walk around with your beer and just take your time.
 
You get out of the shops totally in peace and you find you’ve bought something.
 
Consumers are constantly telling us how they want retailers to ramp up efforts to engage them in store – samples and taste tests, advice and demonstration. Perhaps even cute shelf stackers?
 
A lady can dream.

For the original article from Business Review Weekly click here.